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Addiction Drug Rehab Treatment – Rehabilitation and Rehab for Addicts

Drug and Alcohol Rehabs

Every year, more money is spent promoting the use of alcohol than any other product. Perhaps through its elaborate and creative marketing, the most basic, yet important fact about alcohol is often overlooked — alcohol is a drug — the most commonly used and widely abused psychoactive drug in the world . One concept that many people find difficult to accept is that alcoholism and alcohol problems are a disease.

Research has shown that alcohol interacts with the body’s systems in predictable ways to lead to physiological addiction. Even at low doses, alcohol significantly impairs the judgment and coordination required to drive a car or operate machinery safely. Low to moderate doses of alcohol can also increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, including domestic violence and child abuse.  Effects of moderate alcohol intake include dizziness and talkativeness. The immediate effects of a larger amount of alcohol include slurred speech, disturbed sleep, nausea, and vomiting. “Hangovers” are another effect after large amounts of alcohol are consumed — symptoms including headache, nausea, thirst, dizziness, and fatigue. Prolonged, heavy use of alcohol can lead to addiction (alcoholism). Sudden cessation of long term, extensive alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. More often than not Drug and Alcohol rehab is a true necessity to help someone overcome their addiction.

Throughout much of the last century, scientists studying drug abuse labored in the shadows of powerful myths and misconceptions about the nature of addiction. Today, thanks to science, our views and our responses to drug abuse have changed dramatically. Groundbreaking discoveries about the brain have revolutionized our understanding of drug addiction, enabling us to respond effectively to the problem. Recent scientific advances have revolutionized our understanding of drug abuse and addiction, which is now recognized as a chronic relapsing brain disease expressed in the form of compulsive behaviors. This understanding has improved our ability to both prevent and treat addiction with drug and alcohol rehab.

Nearly all addicted individuals believe at the outset that they can stop using drugs on their own, and most try to stop without treatment or any assistance from professionals. Although some people are successful, many attempts result in failure to achieve long-term abstinence. Research has shown that long-term drug abuse results in changes in the brain that persist long after a person stops using drugs. These drug-induced changes in brain function can have many behavioral consequences, including an inability to exert control over the impulse to use drugs despite adverse consequences—the defining characteristic of addiction. More often than not Drug and Alcohol Rehab is required to help an addict achieve true sobriety and once again become a contributing member of society.

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