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Teenage Drug Abuse Statistics on Cocaine

MTF (Monitoring the Future) assesses the extent and perceptions of teen drug abuse with cocaine among 8th, 10th, and 12th grade students nationwide.

There was only one statistically significant change in cocaine abuse measured between 2003 and 2004. Tenth-graders reported an increase in 30-day abuse of powder cocaine, from 1.1 percent in 2003 to 1.5 percent in 2004.

Overall annual cocaine abuse increased in each grade from the early 1990s until 1998 or 1999 and has subsequently stabilized or declined somewhat. Among 12th-graders, the rate increased from 3.1 percent in 1992 to 6.2 percent in 1999, declined significantly to 5.0 percent in 2000, and remained stable through 2003 at 4.8 percent. Among 10th-graders, the rate increased from 1.9 percent in 1992 to 4.9 percent in 1999.

In 2004, 3.7 percent of 10th-graders reported annual cocaine abuse, significantly below the peak in 1999, though year-to-year changes were not significant. Among 8th-graders, 1.1 percent reported annual cocaine use in 1991, a figure that increased to 3.0 percent in 1996, hovered around that point for several years, then dropped to 2.0 percent in 2004, significantly below the 1996 high point.

 

Use of Cocaine in Any Form by Students, 2004:
Monitoring the Future Survey

 

 8th-Graders

 10th-Graders

 12th-Graders

Lifetime

3.4%

5.4%

8.1%

Annual

2.0 

3.7 

5.3 

30-Day

0.9 

1.7 

2.3 

 

 

Crack Cocaine Use by Students, 2004:
Monitoring the Future Sruvey

 

 8th-Graders

 10th-Graders

 12th-Graders

Lifetime

2.4%

2.6%

3.9%

Annual

1.3 

1.7 

2.3 

30-Day

0.6 

0.8 

1.0 

 

Eighth-graders reported a significant decrease in perceived availability of both crack and powder cocaine in 2004. Twelfth-graders, however, reported a significant increase in perceived availability of both crack and cocaine in 2004.  It is evident in the above statistics that the teenage drug use on cocaine increases as they get older.

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